Biosphere Reserves in Canada

There are 18 UNESCO biosphere reserves in Canada, and they are home to some two million people. 

Canadian biosphere reserves encourage:

  • Sustainable tourism
  • Education for sustainable development
  • Ecosystem services
  • Land management

They are also beginning to focus on social enterprise, and strengthening their collaborations with indigenous peoples.

Canada's 16 biosphere reserves share resources and best practices through the Canadian Biosphere Reserves Association (CBRA).

Becoming a biosphere reserve

In Canada, designation as a biosphere reserve takes about a decade. Every 10 years, following designation, reviews are completed to ensure program criteria are still being met.

The process for consideration as a UNESCO biosphere reserve begins with the submission of a letter of intent to the Canadian Commission for UNESCO. Successful applicants are then invited to submit full proposals by May 31 of each year.

Biosphere reserve activities

You can find more information about any of the following Canadian biosphere reserves by clicking on them:

Mont Saint-Hilaire, Quebec (1978)

Waterton, Alberta (1979)

Riding Mountain, Manitoba (1986)

Long Point, Ontario (1986)

Charlevoix, Quebec (1988)

Niagara Escarpment, Ontario (1990)

Redberry Lake, Saskatchewan (2000)

Lac-Saint-Pierre, Quebec (2000)

Clayoquot Sound, British Columbia (2000)

Mount Arrowsmith, British Columbia (2000)

Southwest Nova, Nova Scotia (2001)

Frontenac Arch, Ontario (2002)

Georgian Bay, Ontario (2004)

Fundy, New Brunswick (2007)

Manicouagan-Uapishka, Quebec (2007)

Bras d’or Lake, Nova Scotia (2011)

Tsá Tué, Northwest Territories (2016)

Beaver Hills, Alberta (2016)

Contact biosphere reserves directly for annual reports and periodic reviews.